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Forum Home > General Discussion > Clothing....or how do I make that?

Isabel
Member
Posts: 51

There are many resources for historic clothing, from patterns to pictures, out there. Often however they assume a level of ability that is above and well beyond that of the hobby sewer. Materials of diverse and wonderful authenticity are cited and frequently are as unobtainable as hen's teeth and twice as pricey. Where am I going with this?

 

Over time I have garnered a few tricks, sources,  and resources I'm willing to share.

 

I have logged almost twenty years of self employment making both modern and historic clothing as well as doing repairs and restorations. This  has allowed me to aquire knowledge in the old fashioned hands on way. 

 

Ask a question and I will do my best to answer or at least steer you on a course of self education [books etc.]. I'll keep my eye on the forums so tag a post on here for help.

 

Isabel, the tailor's grandchild

March 4, 2010 at 1:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Lee A. Farruga
Site Owner
Posts: 282

Isabel - what a wonderful idea! Thank you for starting this thread.

March 4, 2010 at 10:13 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Edain Duguay
Administrator
Posts: 16

Excellent idea! :)

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From the desk of ~

Lady Edwina Uffington-Smythe

(AKA Edain Duguay)

Administrator of Steampunk Canada and Officer of Steampunk Ottawa


March 5, 2010 at 11:09 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Isabel
Member
Posts: 51

For anyone looking for patterns that have a bit more accurate history behind them than the main stream buy it at Fabricland brands check out the link below. Once there go to the Romantic Section of the pattern collections for Victorian and Edwardian patterns.

I have worked with Folkwear's patterns and they expect the user to have a degree of experience sewing. Nothing to be scared of but  most of their patterns require both patience and some time to create a custom garment.

http://www.folkwear.com

 

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June 8, 2010 at 1:14 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Stuart
Member
Posts: 185

thanks for that link Isabel, the Belgian Military Chef's jacket might just be perfect for what I am trying to do.

October 20, 2010 at 5:09 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Minerva Li
Member
Posts: 36

oooh I can vouch for Folkware.  I LOVE them.  We carry them in our DIY shop because they're soooo much better than the Big three patterns tend to be.

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The Renfield Trading Company - Serving the Undead Since 2010.  http://www.TheRenfieldTradingCompany.com


http://www.GothicBeauty.com

http://www.DressUpandDuel.com

October 20, 2010 at 7:48 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Stuart
Member
Posts: 185

thats great!  I'm still debating a few options for my jacket (which, thus far, the hardest).  Its been a toss up between a military style (a la Sharpe's War, or similar to that Chef's Jacket) or just a bonny prince charlie style jacket, that is,  coat with tails.  I am very glad I found these patterns though

October 20, 2010 at 10:56 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tara
Member
Posts: 2

Too bad I can't sew to save my life ;) and I'm poor, so I have to find all my gear at Thrift shops! However, my MUM knows how to sew and is actually quite good, so perhas I can convince her to make me some of these! :D

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You'd think I'd know better ;)

Young Adult cancer survivor and Activist

http://2y4c.wordpress.com/about/

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October 21, 2010 at 10:44 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Isabel
Member
Posts: 51

Stuart, Dover publications reprinted a book with a lot of middle and eastern European military and state garments in it. The original was I think done around 1900 and includes exploded view patterns of many of the garments with the measurements marked on them. I'll look up the name and ISBN tonight.

BTW Dover has lots of repro'd, copied or whatever you want to name it books from prior times.

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October 25, 2010 at 12:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Stuart
Member
Posts: 185

Isabel you are a fount of knowledge and I adore you for it!  Thank you for your help.

October 25, 2010 at 5:24 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Isabel
Member
Posts: 51

The book I referred to in my prior post is called A History of Costume by Carl Kohler. It has over 300 patterns and illustrations. ISBN 0-486-21030-8 is the unabridged republication of the 1928 English edition.  Please note that Carl Kohler lived from 1825 to 1876 with his occupation cited as painter.

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October 26, 2010 at 1:02 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Isabel
Member
Posts: 51

Correction the book has over 600 patterns and illustrations.

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October 26, 2010 at 1:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Roger
Member
Posts: 2
This is sort of a random question: Ascots. I know vaguely what they are. My question is: Would it be feasible, do you think, to take a modern necktie and "open it up" into an ascot? I mean remove that seam in the back that makes it into a tube. Just wondering. All the best, Roger
November 1, 2010 at 6:12 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Stuart
Member
Posts: 185

probably feasible.  Just based on what I've seen of ascots.  Your other option is to go to a thrift store, or somewhere like a Buck or TWo or a Dollarama.  You can get scarfs there, and you can do the same sort of tying but get a similar effect.  (btw, google "How to tie an ascot" and you'll see how much like an opened up tie they are)

November 1, 2010 at 6:17 PM Flag Quote & Reply

planish
Member
Posts: 9

It's more for post-WWI fashions, but many of the skills and techniques could be applicable to steampunk :

http://vintagesewing.info/index.html

A sample from their first page ...

-------------------------------------------------------------

Browse

If you would prefer, you can browse a specific decade (pre-1900, 1900's, 1910's, 1920's, 1930's, 1940's, 1950's),


or browse by category:(

dressmaking

school textbook

sewing course

pattern design (drafting, draping, etc.)

tailoring

glovemaking

millinery

laundry/dry cleaning


Top-Five List

Please take a look at the Candidates for Inclusion and vote for your preference for the next publication to be added to the library. The current top-five list of works to be added:(

The Modern Tailor, Outfitter and Clothier, A. S. Bridgland, MJI (General Editor), The Claxton Publishing Company, Ltd. (Vol.1, 288 pages; Vol. 2, 263 pages; Vol. 3, 308 pages) 1936


Coat and Suit Making, Minne A. Anderson, M.A., Burgess Publishing Co. (37 pages) 1931


Dainty Work for Pleasure and Profit, Minne A. Anderson, M.A., Burgess Publishing Co. (459 pages) 1902


A Bag of Tricks for Home Sewing, "Cotton Bags give you Tested Sewing Fabrics," Sewing with Feed Sacks. The National Cotton Council of America, (32 pages) early 1940's

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November 8, 2010 at 12:00 PM Flag Quote & Reply

planish
Member
Posts: 9

DIY felt hats: Have a look at http://www.costumes.org/advice/costcraftsmanual/tmpjk10.htm , "A FELT HAT USING STANDARD FABRIC STORE CRAFT FELT"


It works, by golly. See http://www.northernelectric.ca/medieval/hats/dmp/dmproject.htm

November 8, 2010 at 12:06 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Isabel
Member
Posts: 51

Burda Sewing Patterns [google them] actually have a section marked "steampunk" . The site is not easy to navigate but persistence and nothing better to do at lunch time will yield some treasures.

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December 17, 2010 at 1:41 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Stuart
Member
Posts: 185

their steampunk page seems to start here

December 17, 2010 at 6:13 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Isabel
Member
Posts: 51

Giving this post a boost to the top. We'll all be getting cabin fever once the festivities settledown and creating new clothing, accessories and props is one way to combat it.

Check out the past issues of the Dominion Dispatch for some of my free patterns that require little in the way of material or experience to enhance your wardrobe.

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December 20, 2011 at 12:59 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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