Steampunk Canada

Tie up Your Dirigible and Visit for a Spell

Forums

Post Reply
Forum Home > General Discussion > Steampunk social structure

Alice Blacktail Keys
Member
Posts: 7

Hello everyone.

Im new to steampunk and i was sondering what the social structure is for it like is it like Victorian's upper, middle and lower class and what would be in said classes in there social world.

Im asking because im creating two steampunk prosonas a Pirate, im pretty good with where she would be with in a social structure since iv seen a lot of pirate movies and read about them a lot, and the other i wanted to be a younge 14 -16 year old girl that would be in the upper class but im not sure what that would involve what kind of work would her parents do, how much money would they make and what kind of obligations would she have.

If someone could help me out to understand some of this better so i can create her background properly i would be very greatful. 

--

June 19, 2012 at 10:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Stuart
Member
Posts: 185

well, at its root, yes, steampunk would mimic the social structures of say 1840-1902 (+/- a decade).  On the flipside, the punk part means a noticeable focus on the fringes of society.  I guess what I'm saying is yes, both are viable options that would fit into a normally defined victorian style society.  I can answer more questions if you want to

--


June 19, 2012 at 10:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Lee Ann Farruga
Site Owner
Posts: 282

Alice, because steampunk is absolutely NOT historically accurate (unless you want it to be) you can take your two ideas and play with them as much as you want.  For your 14-16 yr old persona, you could have her parents own a candy factory with crazy steampunk machines that make the candy.  You can make it up as you go or come up with your whole story at once.  But definitely don't worry that you have to have the class structure exactly historically correct.  Have fun!

--

Canadian Queen of Steampunk. Founder of Steampunk Canada.

June 20, 2012 at 5:46 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alice Blacktail Keys
Member
Posts: 7

Thank you both for the help.

I really like teh candy factory idea. that gave me lots of ideas that i could use and make what i had in mind for her different but better in the long run. 

June 20, 2012 at 8:06 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Jedediah Solomon
Member
Posts: 40

Oh, yes... then by all means, The Gene Wilder version of "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" and of course Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" (from 1971 and 1967 ) are manditory veiwings.  I like the idea of a young, rebellious girl, the parents of  whom own a chocolate factory and she has an arguement with her overbearing mother, and runs away to join up with a band of pirates.  Why not?   lol


June 28, 2012 at 4:11 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Lady Alice of Ardvreck
Member
Posts: 1

oo another Alice. In my case I tend to lean towards my real family line for the most part as it has 5 castles, my castle in particular, Ardvreck, is a heap of rubble but it still has mystery and intrigue behind it. Everyone has their own thign in steampunk and I decided to be a Geologist. I spent a good 5 years in Labrador, the Iron Ore capital of Canada and picked up a lot of neat things there so I figured why not make that into steampunk. After all everone needs metals and gems for their weapons and the likes. By law I am supposed to be an upper class with a legal lady title but that doesn't stop me from getting dirty. Being a Lady gets old fast lol. Too much pomp and proper. All I want to do is have fun!! So you do what makes you happy not what society demands.

--


July 3, 2012 at 12:01 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alice Blacktail Keys
Member
Posts: 7

Thank you for this insite Alice. ^^

--

July 6, 2012 at 5:24 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Erin Latimer
Member
Posts: 34

Well if you're talking proper 19th century young woman, her father would could do anything as long as it made him rich. He could own a shipyard, shipping company, or trading company. The mother would of course, be unemployed, and spend all her time planning social functions and attending other's social functions. She also might be big into charity, since it was fashionable at the time. A young woman would probably be learning from a governess at home. Her mother might be teaching her needlework and how to run a household, or rather, boss the servants. A young woman would be expected to get married, settle down and have lots of babies. Of course, we all know the beauty of steampunk is that you can turn 19th century normalities on their head and make it whatever you want.

--

Steampunk blog: http://www.thepunkettes.com/

Personal blog: http://www.museslibrary.blogspot.ca/

July 10, 2012 at 10:54 AM Flag Quote & Reply

PM
Moderator
Posts: 84

In the upper class, the father wouldn't necessarily be involved in industry (unless they recently rose in wealth, and were still involved in commerce). There was very little in the way of income tax, so the wealthy could live off their investments. Those who could, bought land, and with land came both income and responsibilities; a large estate was essentially a large business, with all kinds of activities involved in running it. Women were expected to mainly be interested in the domestic management, which in the case of the upper classes could be huge households with dozens of servants, making them rather like large hotels. Remember, too, that social functions were business as well. In Britain, at an rate, the upper class was the ruling class, and so who you knew and were friends with influenced your access to positions of power. Wealthy landowners tended to be the people who appointed the local clergy, and acted as justices of the peace, making the nobility and the squirearchy central to local government. It was long before a centralized welfare state, so the organization of local charity provided the only social safety net.

--

¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
Sent from the analytical engine of
www.PaulMarlowe.com

¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤

July 10, 2012 at 2:11 PM Flag Quote & Reply

You must login to post.